Olympic National Park

Creature Feature: The Banana Slug is Living Proof that a Slimy Little Gastropod Mollusk Can be Loaded with Charisma

You’d think that a mucus-covered, shell-less, forest-dwelling gastropod whose diet includes animal droppings couldn’t get much love, but the lowly banana slug has acquired a huge fan following. Among other things, it is the star of a community festival, official state mollusk of California, and one of America’s most beloved sports mascots.

NPCA: Independent Review Shows Wolf Population Goals Too Low in Washington State

Wolf population targets laid out in a draft management plan by Washington Department of Fish and Game officials are too low to sustain a viable population, according to some independent scientists who reviewed the proposal.
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Dining At The Parks: Roasted Acorn Squash With Scallops From Lake Quinault Lodge

While scallops can taste great by themselves with a little salt and pepper, this recipe from Lake Quinault Lodge on the southern border of Olympic National Park complements them with the nuttiness of acorn squash. Thanks to Executive Chef Patrick Norris for sharing this recipe.

Reader Participation Day: Which National Park Brings the Best Out In Your Camera?

Redrock and Snow, copyright Kurt Repanshek
It's a given: national parks are great places to take photographs. And yet, there are some parks that seem to produce better photos from my camera than others. Which national parks do you find the most photogenic?

Reader Participation Day: Where Are the Best Waterfalls In the National Park System?

Waterfall Ohe o Gorge, Haleakala National Park, copyright Q.T. Luong
Two of the most incredible waterfalls in the National Park System can be found in Yellowstone National Park. But it certainly doesn't have a monopoly on waterworks. Olympic National Park boasts the beautifully secluded Marymere Falls, Glacier National Park the towering Bird Woman Falls, and Great Smoky Mountain National Park the comparatively small but gorgeous-just-the-same Abrams Falls. What other waterfalls in the park system deserve to be singled out for their beauty?

Hurricane Ridge Road Set to Reopen Saturday in Olympic National Park

Barring weather problems, Hurricane Ridge Road in [url=http://www.nps.gov/olym]Olympic National Park[/url] should be back in business on Saturday, a week earlier than was predicted when a contractor was hired to repair road damage caused by a landslide.

Final Batch of Fishers to Be Freed in Olympic National Park

Three years have passed since Washington state and Olympic National Park officials embarked down the road of fisher recovery in the national park. On Saturday, the final batch of these weasel-like predators were to be set free into the park's backcountry.

Proposed Boundary Change Would Add Nearly 241 Acres to Olympic National Park

A boundary change being proposed at Olympic National Park would add nearly 241 acres to the park in the name of sockeye salmon habitat protection.

Creature Feature: The Marbled Murrelet is a Flagship Species in the Old-Growth Forest Preservation Movement.

Logging in the old-growth forests of the North Pacific Coast is being blamed for the sharp decline of the marbled murrelet population. More logging restrictions are needed to save the little seabird, and that is causing quite a stir.

Spring Lodging Deals Announced For Olympic National Park Properties

With spring right around the corner in some parts of the country, lodging deals are starting to appear on the national park landscape. At Olympic National Park, for example, you can land in a room for as little as $79 a night.

Washington's National Park Fund Looking For Volunteers Interested in Marmots

Interested in marmots? Enjoy Olympic National Park? Can you spare some time this summer? If you answered 'Yes' to those questions, the folks at Washington's National Park Fund want to hear from you.

Olympic National Park To Rehab Boulder Creek Area, Erase Creek Road

The Boulder Creek Road in Olympic National Park soon will be no more. Park officials have made the decision to remove the remaining vestiges of the road and rehabilitate the corridor for hikers and stock travel and restore the Boulder Creek Campground.

Hurricane Ridge Road Repairs in Olympic National Park Expected to Take Six Weeks

Engineers say it will take six weeks to rebuild a 100-foot-long stretch of the Hurricane Ridge Road in Olympic National Park that collapsed the other day.

Mudslide Closes Hurricane Ridge Road in Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park, which has been beaten and battered in recent years by powerful storms, lost a 100-foot section of roadway leading up to Hurricane Ridge when soil saturated by recent heavy rains spurred a mudslide.

Some Unusual Lodges To Consider For Your Next National Park Visit

Any mention of national park lodges causes most people to envision park icons such as Old Faithful Inn, El Tovar, Ahwahnee, or Many Glacier Hotel. Dozens of other national park lodges are scattered across the country, of course, although many receive little publicity and remain virtually unknown to many experienced travelers.

Third Year of Fisher Recovery Program Begins At Olympic National Park

They might not be the economic draw that wolves are to Yellowstone National Park, but fishers seem to be taking to Olympic National Park just about as favorably as the larger predators did to Yellowstone in their recovery program. This week a third batch of the cat-sized predators will be set free in Olympic to build on two successful years of a recovery program designed to repopulate the park with fishers.

Where to Find Your Christmas Feast in the National Park System

'Tis the season for quiet and peace, snowy woods, frosty starry nights, time with loved ones, festive activities, and eating way too much food. What better way to accomplish all that than to spend the holidays at a national park?

Rediscovering the Lowly Lichen across the National Park System

Lungwort, copyright Kirby Adams
Lichens, which sprout throughout the National Park System, are the Rodney Dangerfield of the natural world. They just don’t get any respect. Lichenologists likewise don’t garner much recognition for their lifetimes spent poking around the crusty grey stuff on tree trunks. Among others, one intrepid man in California is taking steps to remedy both of those deficiencies.

Annual Holiday Gift Sale Coming to Olympic National Park

Here's a sale not to be missed if you find yourself near Olympic National Park in mid-December.

Lodging Deals To Be Had At Olympic National Park Through December 30

December can be an intriguing month in Olympic National Park. Crowds are non-existent, stormy seas can kick up incredible waves that explode against sea stacks, while in the high country deep snows can accumulate. And through December 30 you can catch a break on lodging at either Kalaloch or Lake Quinault lodges.

Yet Another November Storm Wallops Olympic National Park

A wet, windy storm pounded Olympic National Park on Tuesday, leaving behind roads closed by downed trees, floodwaters, and heavy snow.

Firefighter's Death Underscores Need For Promise Of Swift Evacuation From Fire Lines

Homer. The writings of Sun Tzu, a 6th-century Chinese military strategist. Midnight walks through Rome after a night at the opera. These are hints of who Andrew "Andy" Palmer was at just 18, an age of transition in life, a point where youth transforms to adult and begins to chart a path through life.

A Firefighter's Death Leads to Internal Analysis Of Protocols By National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service

It would appear from reading the investigative report into the death of an 18-year-old Olympic National Park firefighter could have been prevented on a number of fronts. What lessons did the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service take from this incident?

How Many Wolves Are Enough In Washington State?

Wolves have made a remarkable comeback in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem since the recovery plan was launched in the mid-1990s. Concerned that the predators will find their way into Washington state, officials there are developing a management plan. But how many wolves are enough wolves?

Report Details Errors That Led to The Death of A Young National Park Firefighter

Fighting forest fires is one of the most dangerous occupations to partake in. And yet, many of those who fight these blazes are energized by the danger they encounter. You might say they get an adrenalin high battling the flames. And some firefighters die, more often than not because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. That appears to have been the case when a young firefighter from Olympic National Park died on the fire lines in 2008.

Lodging Deals From Coast to Coast in the National Parks

Whether you can thank the hoopla around National Parks: America's Best Idea, or attribute it to the weak economy, there are a number of lodging deals available to be had around the National Park System.

Olympic National Park Boosts Stream Flows to Help Salmon, But Might Not Be Enough

Reports on climate change and national parks often mention parks as valuable in helping wildlife species survive by providing environmental sanctuaries of sorts. But a case playing out at Olympic National Park demonstrates how parks might not always be able to provide wildlife with what they need during climatic changes.

Update on Razor Clam Harvest at Olympic National Park Set for October 7

A bounty from the sea is in the offing at Olympic National Park, where there could be a razor clam season this fall after two years without clamming allowed.

The Pacific Northwest Trail Will Establish Important Linkages

The newly designated Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail will link three national parks, seven national forests, several major mountain ranges, and two border-to border national scenic trails. One day it will also be a key link in the coast-to-coast pathway that trail developers have been dreaming about.

SPOT – The Good, the Bad and the Silly Uses for Those High-Tech Communicators

SPOT
SPOT units are compact communication devices that can be used to summon help in event of an emergency in remote areas. SPOT can be a life-saving tool, but false alarms by inept users can also be a problem. Recent incidents in two parks illustrate the potential and the pitfalls of modern technology.
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