New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park To Host Exhibit On African-Americans In Civil War

An exhibit that looks at the contributions African-Americans made as nurses, surgeons, and hospital workers during the Civil War will be on display at New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park from December 17 through January 26.

Take A Side Trip From New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park And Voyage 'Round The World

What better way to enjoy New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park than to take a voyage around the world on a 19th century whaler? You can do that, virtually, beginning June 23 with a stop at the New Bedford Whaling Museum.
In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex Weaving together narratives from more than a century ago, Nathaniel Philbrick tells the backstory of Moby Dick, a story that spins out from a real case of a sperm whale attacking an early 19th century whaleship.

Loss of the Historic Baker-Robinson Whale Oil Refinery Rankles Officials at New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

The recent loss of a historic whale oil refinery in the vicinity of New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park serves as a harsh reminder that historic preservation is typically subject to marketplace rules.

National Park Quiz 59: Only

This week’s quiz should take only a little while. Answers are at the end. If we catch you peeking, we’ll enroll you in the Vinnie and Carmine Institute of Attitude Readjustment.

You Still Can Visit Herman Melville's New Bedford

Books can take us on adventures and to places we never thought possible. Through Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, one can travel the mid-19th Century world's oceans and return to a tiny East Coast sea port once viewed as the world's richest cities.

Summertime: What National Parks Are On Your "Must Visit" List?

One-hundred-and-forty-five years had passed since Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson was mortally wounded by "friendly fire" in the woods at Chancellorsville, and yet it might have been yesterday. Thick forest still hangs over the waning vestige of the Old Mountain Road where the general was riding, beyond the front lines, on the night of May 2, 1863, when members of the 18th North Carolina mistook him and his aides for a Union incursion.
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