Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

Photography In The National Parks: Digitally Capturing The Bears In Lake Clark National Park And Preserve

Having focused on the bears during her 2014 photo tour of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Alaska, Rebecca Latson returns to give us some tips on how she captured those shots and how you can use these insights to get amazing bear images of your own.

Subsistence-Collection Regs To Be Developed For National Park Lands In Alaska

Regulations will be developed for gathering of "wild, renewable resources" on national park lands in Alaska where it is allowed.

Fish In National Parks From Alaska To Colorado Have Unhealthy Mercury Levels

Timing often is happenstance, but with Earth Day arriving next week, word of high mercury levels in fish in national parks from Alaska to Colorado is particularly sobering. In some cases, the levels exceed limits OKed for human consumption.

Looking Back At Lake Clark National Park Pioneer Dick Proenneke

For three decades Dick Proenneke lived in a rich slice of Alaskan wilderness that would become Lake Clark National Park and Preserve. He built his cabin by hand and survived off the land. This short video provides some insights into his life at Twin Lakes.

Lake Clark National Park Working To Update Its Management Plan

Thirty years after Lake Clark National Park and Preserve's initial General Management Plan was crafted, officials are working to update it with an eye on more clearly providing for visitors to the remote Alaskan park.

Photography In The National Parks: A Day Trip To Lake Clark National Park And Preserve

Katmai National Park and Preseve in Alaska tops the marquee when brown bears are mentioned, but there's another national park in Alaska that will surprise you with its bear-viewing opportunities.

EPA's Assessment Of Proposed Mine Near Alaska's Lake Clark National Park Raises Many Theoretical Concerns

Bristol Bay watershed by Robert Glenn Ketchum
Miles and miles of lost or blocked streams. Thousands of acres of lost wetlands. Biological shudders through the underlying ecosystem. Those are some of the potential impacts of a massive mining operation being considered on a landscape near Lake Clark National Park and Preserve in Alaska.

Sportsmen Groups Boost Pressure On EPA, Land Management Agencies To Protect Alaska's Bristol Bay From Potential Mine

Hundreds of outdoors groups, from big game outfitters to fishing groups, are maintaining the pressure on federal officials to ensure that a gold mine proposed to be built near Lake Clark National Park and Preserve does not impair the Bristol Bay watershed and its fisheries.
AttachmentSize
Sportsmen-Bristol Bay.pdf235.91 KB

EPA Agrees To Study Bristol Bay Watershed In Connection with Gold Mine Proposed Near Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

Fears that a massive mining operation proposed to be developed near Lake Clark National Park and Preserve could impact the water quality and fisheries of Bristol Bay have convinced the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to gather baseline data on the watershed.

Research Fellowships Being Offered at National Parks In Alaska

The National Park Service is currently accepting applications for research fellowships in national parks and preserves in Alaska.

Could Joe Miller Really Force the Federal Government to Hand Over Denali National Park to Alaska?

Alaska's latest political upstart, Joe Miller, wants to go Wyoming Gov. David Freudenthal one better. While Governor Freudenthal had threatened to sell state lands within Grand Teton National Park to the highest bidder, Mr. Miller wants the federal government to turn over all national parks to the Alaskan government.

Frogs Are A Sure Sign of Spring, But That Doesn't Mean You Won't Hear Them Now

If you want to know whether Spring is on the way, don’t look to groundhogs for the answer. Instead, listen for the frogs. Certain species of frogs, such as the wood frog, begin singing even when there is still snow on the ground.

Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is In Excellent Condition, But Could That Be Jepodarized By Mining Interests?

When Dick Proenneke fled to Alaska in 1967, he headed to a remote, rugged, and incredibly beautiful wilderness. Today that setting -- Lake Clark National Park and Preserve -- continues to be remote, rugged, and incredibly beautiful. While an analysis of impacts to the park and its resources shows it's in excellent condition, overall, the prospect of mining just outside the park poses a significant threat to Lake Clark's resources.

Traveler's Top 10 Rivers to Ride in the National Park System

Sure, the most iconic river in all the land is the Colorado that flows through Grand Canyon National Park. But that doesn't mean you can't find quality river trips elsewhere in the National Park System.

Interior Secretary Salazar Sends $15.2 Million to USGS Volcano Observatories to Improve Monitoring

The five U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Observatories are receiving $15.2 million to help upgrade their monitoring of volcanics across the West, in Alaska, and in Hawaii, including within Yellowstone, Mount Rainier, Hawaii Volcanoes, and Lake Clark national parks.

UPDATE: Mt. Redoubt Volcano Adds Unwelcome Fireworks to Alaska Statehood Anniversary

Mt. Redoubt eruption on March 30, 2009.
Alaska marks 50 years of statehood this year, and Mt. Redoubt, located in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, has crashed the party with a series of impressive eruptions.

Mount Redoubt in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve Erupts as Predicted

Mt. Redoubt vents steam
Alaska's Lake Clark National Park and Preserve is back in the news with the eruption overnight of Mt. Redoubt.

Alaska Game Officials Being Asked to Ease Off On Killing Bears and Wolves in National Park Preserves

For many Lower 48ers, the state of Alaska is perceived as a big, raw chunk of wilderness, complete with booming wildlife populations. And perhaps it is, but there's a growing concern that Alaska's wildlife managers are getting carried away with their bag limits on national park landscapes.

Volcanics in the National Parks: They Ain't All Tied to "Redoubt"

Yellowstone National Park entered the new year shaking and rattling. Fortunately, there hasn’t been any real rolling just yet. But over at Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Redoubt Volcano has been going through its own gyrations, and volcanologists suspect it just might erupt any time now. Against that backdrop, if you want to see volcanics in action, or signs thereof, the National Park System has many opportunities for you.

Lake Clark National Park's Redoubt Volcano Still Sputtering and Fuming, But No Eruption. Yet.

Scientists are continuing to take the pulse of Redoubt Volcano in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve 24 hours a day. While more than a week ago they were saying an eruption was "imminent," this week they've stepped away from that pronouncement somewhat.

If Science in Lake Clark National Park Is Good, Is It Also Good in Yellowstone National Park?

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar is praising the scientists who are keeping tabs on Redoubt Volcano in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, using them as an example of "the importance of investing in science..." Which begs the question of whether science is just as important elsewhere in the National Park System?

Updated: Lake Clark National Park's Redoubt Volcano Begins To Awake, Eruption Thought to be Imminent

Yellowstone National Park drew geologists' attention early this year with a long swarm of small earthquakes. And now a volcano in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve seems to be waking up, with geologists saying an eruption is imminent.

National Park Quiz 15: Ring of Fire

This week’s quiz tests your knowledge of geologic features and processes in the national parks that lie within the Pacific Ring of Fire, an area of frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that rings the Pacific Basin. Answers are at the end. If we catch you peeking, we'll make you write "convergent boundary" 100 times on the whiteboard.

Is Mining Threatening Our National Parks in Alaska?

The history of mining in Alaska has left a legacy of pollution and other harmful negative impacts to our lands and waters, including those now protected within our National Park System. While some of these old mines are now being cleaned up, others are creating new problems.

Park History: Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

Though not one of the most remote national parks in Alaska, Lake Clark National Park and Preserve isn't at a loss for rugged and spectacular terrain. Across its 4-million-plus acres you can find plenty of places to achieve solitude.

Twenty-seven Years Ago, Eight National Parks Came to Be

Never before have, and probably never again will, so many national parks come into existence on the same date. Given birth by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act were Denali, Gates of Arctic, Glacier Bay, Katmai, Kenai Fjords, Kobuk Valley, Lake Clark and Wrangell-St. Elias national parks.

Trekking to Dick Proenneke's Cabin in Lake Clark National Park

Self-reliance in the wilderness can be an intoxicating goal. Shucking society's masses, plights, and foibles for a perceived 'simpler' life in the backcountry can be a heady ambition. Dick Proenneke did it nearly 40 years ago, finding self-reliant comfort in the backwoods of Alaska in a place now known as Lake Clark National Park and Preserve.

Marketing Alaska's National Parks; Why Not All National Parks?

I hate jumping to conclusions. But that apparently is exactly what I did when I surmised that the proposed $1.5 million centennial project involving the Alaska Travel Industry Association would benefit the cruise-ship industry more than the parks.

Friends of Dick Proenneke

One of the more popular posts on the original National Parks Traveler was about Dick Proenneke, a modern-day mountain man if ever there was one who headed off to Alaska in 1967 to live in the wilderness. I often learned that folks discovered the Traveler site by Googling for Dick. Well, now there's a Yahoo! Groups page dedicated to him.
Syndicate content