Grand Canyon National Park

Search Continues For Plane Possibly Missing Over Grand Canyon National Park

A search is ongoing over Grand Canyon National Park for a plane that's been missing in the area since last weekend.

Grand Canyon "State" Park? A Look Back At The 1995 Government Shutdown And The Battle Over the Grand Canyon

Back in 1995, the last time the federal government shut down over a budget impasse, then-Arizona Gov. Fife Symington showed incredible moxie by trying to engineer a state takeover of Grand Canyon National Park.

Reader Participation Day: Should Costs Of Operating Special Programs In the Parks Be Shared By All?

Should the National Park Service do away with special use fees and simply spread the costs of running special programs across all those who enter the parks?

Archeology Day Offers Hands-On Activities at Grand Canyon National Park on March 19

If you have even a passing interest in archeology, the upcoming Archeology Day at Grand Canyon National Park on Saturday, March 19 will be a great chance for some hands-on activities and learning opportunities.

National Park Quiz 92: Seconds

You can't take this quiz in just a few seconds, but if you invest a few minutes you'll find out if you know as much about seconds as you do about firsts.

Give Us A National Park, But Please, Not Its Regulations

We love our national parks. We love the wildlife they hold, the seashores with their sparkling sands, the forests with their wildlife and hiking trails, the soaring red-rock cliffs and plunging canyons. But please, don't ask us to abide by their regulations.

Public Comment Opens On Whether to Allow Uranium Mining Near Grand Canyon National Park

For the next month-and-a-half the U.S. Bureau of Land Management will be collecting your thoughts on whether uranium mining should be allowed near to Grand Canyon National Park, or whether the landscape should be protecting with a moratorium against hardrock mining.

Grand Canyon National Park Rangers Working to Recover Body Thought To Be That Of Missing Woman

Grand Canyon National Park rangers were working this morning to recover a body thought to be that of a woman reported missing by her husband. The body was located about 600 feet below the South Rim.

Grand Canyon National Park Releases Draft EIS On Park Air Tours

Years of modeling, planning, and talks, interrupted by lawsuits and inter-agency differences, have produced a proposed air-tour management plan for Grand Canyon National Park that officials believe will restore natural quiet over much of the iconic canyon.

Time to Get Your Permit Application in For Private Float Through Grand Canyon National Park

One of, if not the, most-sought permits in the National Park System is the one that allows private groups to run the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park. If you want one, the park is now taking applications for the 2012 calendar year.

Keeping Track So They're Never Forgotten: National Park Service Workers Who Died on The Job

The list is long, more than 200 names stretching over a century and then some. It's a somber one, as well, tracking the deaths of National Park Service employees from a wide range of fates, from heart attacks to rockfalls to cold-blooded murder.

Updated: Budgeting At Grand Canyon National Park Is Not Always As Simple As You Might Think

The recent debate over mule rides in Grand Canyon National Park has left park officials, who say they have to live within their budgets and the public's desires, strongly criticized by mule backers, who say trail impacts might be less of an issue if park managers were smarter with how they spend their money.

BuRec Issues Draft Environmental Assessment Looking At High-Flow Releases From Glen Canyon Dam

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials have released a draft environmental assessment that proposes a decade-long series of experimental high-flow releases of the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam and through Grand Canyon National Park.

Watching Climate Change Across the National Park System

Across the National Park System many changes are expected from climate change, from more wildfires and vanishing glaciers to invasions of non-native species and flight of long-term residents. Writer/photographer Michael Lanza, concerned that today's park landscapes will change significantly by the time his young kids are his age, has been touring the park system with his family to show his children what they might miss later in life.

Grand Canyon National Park Officials Release Stock Use Plan, Including Mule Ride Quotas

While mule rides will continue at Grand Canyon National Park under a new stock use plan, only 10 visitors a day will be allowed to ride below the South Rim, a decision lamented by some who say it will deprive many of venturing into the canyon's Inner Gorge.

Updated: Kayaker Fails To Navigate Colorado River Rapid In Grand Canyon National Park

A kayaker on a private river trip down the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park failed to successfully navigate a rapid and was pronounced dead after efforts to revive him failed.

Progress Continuing On Visitor Services Improvements on South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park

Better transportation, parking, and picnicking are among the improvements recently completed on the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park.

What Are The Top Issues Confronting The National Park System?

What are the top issues confronting the National Park System? A slew of answers could be tacked onto that question, ranging from sprawl outside park boundaries and habitat fragmentation to pollution.

Grand Canyon National Park Officials Point To Accomplishments in 2009, 2010

From building restoration work and trail improvements to additional visitor facilities and improved employee housing, much has been accomplished at Grand Canyon National Park the past two years, according to park officials.

Grand Canyon National Park Superintendent Steve Martin Hanging Up His Hat

After 35 years with the National Park Service, Steve Martin has decided it's time to hang up his Stetson. The superintendent of Grand Canyon National Park has announced that he'll retire as of January 1.

National Parks On Average Are The Backdrops for 41 "Suicide Events" Annually

For an overwhelming majority of visitors, national parks offer spectacular vistas that provide surroundings perfect for enjoyment, contemplation, and relaxation. For a small, yet significant, number, though, the parks are where they decide to die.

Creature Feature: The Desert Tarantula Looks Big, Hairy, and Scary

The tarantula's fearsome appearance belies the fact that this docile, reclusive creature is nearly harmless.

Missing From the System? Tule Springs Harbors Ice Age Fossils In An Urban Setting

Not far from the bright lights and card tables of Las Vegas there's a stretch of desert so relished by developers that street names were attached to blueprints of suburbia. Now, though, that landscape and its unique collection of Ice Age fossils is being promoted as the country's next national monument.

Grand Canyon National Park's Watchtower Gets A Facelift

If you've never been to the East Entrance of Grand Canyon National Park, you owe yourself the trip. Naturally, the canyon from this South Rim vista is expansive, and there are wonderful views of the Painted Desert, too, but equally alluring is the Desert View Watchtower. This rustic edifice, built in 1932 by architect Mary Colter, sits hunched against the very rim of the canyon, a lonely outpost, built to be a place for contemplation.

Reader Participation Day: What is the Greatest Threat To Our National Parks?

It seems not a week goes by without some dire issue being identified as a threat to the national parks. One week it might be funding woes, another week pollution, another diversity concerns, and then, of course, there's climate change.

Lead-Tainted Carcasses and Gut Piles Pose Hazards for Endangered Condors

Lead bullets in carcasses and gut piles pose lethal poisoning hazards to carrion feeders. Among the creatures most at risk are the endangered California condors that frequent Grand Canyon National Park and other areas of Arizona and Utah.

Some Good Safety Tips To Keep in Mind While Visiting National Parks This Winter

Winter is one of the best times to enjoy our parks! With majestic, snow-capped mountains and ice-covered lakes, winter provides scenic splendors with an array of exciting activities. While visitation peaks in the summer, national parks receive millions of visitors throughout the winter months, who come to enjoy such activities as skiing, snowshoeing, camping, and hiking in the backcountry, and attending ranger-led programs.

Finding Winter Bliss in a National Park Lodge

Winter can be a blissful time to visit the national parks. You can head south, and enjoy the warm weather and simply pitch your tent, or you can head to the snow belt and explore the parks on skis or snowshoes. But where should you stay? We asked our lodging experts, David and Kay Scott, for their recommendations.

Grand Canyon National Park Crews Working on Making Abandoned Mines Safer

Old abandoned mines are perfect for bats, but they're not ideal for humans. To protect both, crews at Grand Canyon National Park are getting to work on installing bat gates and warning signs at some old mines within the park's borders.
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