Guest Column

Is Global Climate Change A Threat to National Parks? Another Response

In response to a guest column on climate change that disputed the belief that human activities are driving global warming, a quartet of scientists and former National Park Service employees say the evidence for anthropogenic global warming is indisputable.

Op-Ed| Vandalism On Public Lands Steals From Future Generations

Our public lands protect resources that belong to everyone yet some people decide to steal our resources for their own personal enrichment—robbing this and future generations.

Musings From Timpanogos Cave National Monument: Who Gets The Fees?

As fees for recreating on public lands continue to increase, who gets the money? Contributor Lee Dalton came away with some answers to that question from his recent visit to Timpanogos Cave National Monument in Utah.

Musings From Timpanogos Cave National Monument: To Fee or Not to Fee, That Is The Question

User fees are becoming more and more prevalent on public lands used for recreation. Are they worth it? Occasional contributor Lee Dalton, retired from a National Park Service career, muses on that matter after visiting Timpanogos Cave National Monument in central Utah.

Appreciating Space In National Parks

There are worries that a majority of today's younger generations are not interested in spending much time outdoors in natural areas. The Student Conservation Association exists to help nurture and immerse these generations in places such as national parks and national forests. Jane Wong discovered that working in the field with the SCA gave her a great appreciation for the outdoors. This is her story.

Op-Ed: Let's Compromise To Support The National Parks

There is a place to start coming together on the federal budget, and Sen. Patty Murray is well-suited to lead the way as chairwoman of the Senate Budget Committee and a leader in the current, difficult budget negotiations. Shutting down the government — and our national parks — is simply not a reasonable choice.

Guest Column: Where's The Vision For Properly Funding The National Park System?

In the wake of the recent closure of the National Park System, park supporters should redouble their efforts to build a country in which reliable long-term investment in our parks is part of a broader recommitment to our nation’s public interest.

Guest Column: Government Shutdown Highlights Value Of National Parks

The shutdown of our national government, driven by an extremist minority in the U.S. Congress, is economically reckless and, ultimately, politically self-defeating.

Omnes Relinquite Spes, O Vos Intrantes

A tour of a recent recreation vehicle show proves that you really don't need to leave home without (fill in the blank).

Guest Column: Of Wolves And Science

This fall has been a tough one for those who love the wolves of Yellowstone National Park, as more than a few of the predators have been killed outside the park by hunters. Wolf hunting and trapping also is an issue in the Midwest, and the controversy around that issue prompted writer Greg Breining to take a close look at how wolves and science intertwine. It's not always as neat as you might think

Guest Column: Chipping Away At The National Park Service Mission One Park At A Time

Is the National Park Service about to do an "about face" on its position opposing a professional bike race through Colorado National Monument? In a guest column Joan Anzelmo, the monument's former superintendent, expresses her confusion over this possibility and voices hopes the Park Service will stand by its mission and Management Policies.

Guest Column: Election Day And The Dangers Of H.R. 4089, The Sportsmen’s Heritage Bill

In the not-so-distant past, Republicans as well as Democrats were strong proponents of America’s public lands. And both parties usually supported the national parks—most beloved of all public lands. But now, Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan reflect the contempt of the Republican Party’s far right for all public lands—even the national parks, long renowned as “America’s Best Idea.”

Op-Ed: Park Service Finds Support For Protecting Marine Wilderness After Lengthy Drakes Estero Assessment

The recent National Research Council (NRC) report on the National Park Service’s draft environmental plan of Drakes Estero’s future has provided Interior Secretary Salazar with even further support to protect this valuable estuary in Point Reyes National Seashore

Postcard From Alaska: Aboard The Serac At Kenai Fjords National Park

Spending summers in Kenai Fjords National Park and Preserve can be a wonderful experience, even if you're tasked with pulling invasive weeds out of a breathtaking landscape.

A View From The Overlook: Oh, Shenandoah!

The wonders of Shenandoah National Park include its "Creation" story.

A View From The Overlook: A Home For Endangered Rangers

Pardon me for dampening your day with morbid thoughts, but it occurred to me that after you have done all that vigorous post retirement bucket list stuff like climbing all the 14,000 footers in Colorado or hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, and the moment The Chief Ranger calls you to the Big Visitor Center in the Sky, you are going to need a place to hang your hat.

Guest Column: The Keystone XL Pipelines And Coal Hollow Mines Of America

In this guest column, RL Miller, a California-based attorney who keeps watch on environmental issues on public lands, questions the wisdom of allowing the Coal Hollow Mine to expand to more than 3,500 acres near Bryce Canyon National Park.

Issue Of Hunting Brown Bears At Katmai National Preserve Arises Again

Four years ago we brought you a video that touched more than a few nerves. The subject was hunting brown bears in Katmai National Preserve and raised the question of whether it was really sporting or ethical. While the resulting uproar died down, it's creeping up again as Park Service officials seek public comment on a proposal to allow two sport-hunting guide businesses to operate in the preserve.

Spring is a Great Time To Watch For Migratory Birds in the National Parks

Spring is a fantastic time to be outdoors. Along with the beauty of plants in bloom, a trip to a national park can reveal mammals emerging from their hibernation and frogs singing up a storm. But the one spring event that brings countless new and life-long nature lovers to our nation’s parks is the return of migratory songbirds.

A Father Starts To Heal Watching Yellowstone National Park's Wolves

A tall stoic man stood at the back of his pack, consumed by his own thoughts. He had been listening to an instructor from the Yellowstone Association. For a couple of days, he squinted into roadside spotting scopes and absorbed eloquent discourses on natural history. He was there with family members who arrived to watch wolves together in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park.

Should the National Parks Be Marketed Like Disneyworld?

Just imagine if national parks had a marketing program like the one wielded by Disneyworld and other theme parks. Think of the possibilities!

Floating Through Life on the Rio Grande And Big Bend National Park

We don’t expect adventure on a flatwater river, but sometimes it just happens.

Restoring Health to Florida’s Everglades National Park and Its Diverse Wildlife

Much talk has been expended during the past decade concerning the health of Florida's Everglades and Everglades National Park. Now there are substantial signs that real progress is being made in restoring this incredible and unique ecosystem.

A National Park Service Regional Director Shares His Priority List for 2009

Earlier this year the Traveler offered up a post on what priorities we hoped the National Park Service would address in the coming year. Mike Snyder, director of the agency's Intermountain Region, has his own list of issues his region has in its sights this year.

How An Earlier Administration Bolstered The National Parks Through A National Program

The events of this past week and the advent of a new government cannot help but take our minds back to other times in our history, particularly to 1933. It was in that winter, another troubled time in our national history, that Franklin Roosevelt assumed the presidency. As it does now, the United States in 1933 faced severe and unresolved economic problems.

Floods Washing Across Big Bend National Park

Images of volunteers filling sandbags in a race against rising waters have unfortunately become commonplace this year, in locations from the Midwest to the Gulf Coast. You don't normally expect to see such scenes in the desert Southwest, but they were repeated last week in Big Bend National Park.

How We View National Parks Today Matters For Tomorrow

We all love America's national park system, but we often have different expectations about local federal parks than about places farther away. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in arguments about Point Reyes National Seashore.

Park History: De Soto National Memorial

The park marking the spot where Spanish conquistador Hernando De Soto probably didn’t land in North America in 1539 turns 60 today. On March 11, 1948, Congress created the De Soto National Memorial in the mangrove swamp on Shaw’s Point, in Bradenton, Florida.

Would a Change in Gun Laws Be a Threat to National Park Bears?

Katmai bears. NPS Photo.
Would a change in the national park system's gun laws pose a threat to wildlife? In Alaska, there are some concerns that brown bears at Katmai National Park and Preserve might appear too threatening to some gun owners.

Big Cypress National Preserve: Is More ORV Access In Bear Island Unit Wise?

Snowmobiles, off-road vehicles, and personal watercraft are perhaps the most polarizing recreational issues within the national park system. In this guest column, the specter of greater ORV access in Big Cypress National Preserve's Bear Island Unit is examined.
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